Monday, December 03, 2007

Cynthia's
Corner

Murphy's Law of Sewing

It never fails that anything that can go wrong will inevitably happen when you are sewing late at night, on a project that is not yours! This reminds me of Murphy's Law of Sewing. At one time or another I have experienced all of these and you probably have too! Talk back to us! Leave a comment or email us about your Murphy's Law of Sewing moment(s).

Murphy's Laws of Sewing
(Anonymous)

  • Fusible interfacings always fuse to the iron.
  • The serger only eats the customer's garment.
  • If you need 6 buttons, you will find 5 in your button box.
  • The seam you meant to rip out is invariably the other one.
  • When you are in a hurry, the needle eye is always too small.
  • The fabric you forgot to pre-shrink will always shrink the most.
  • The pattern you wanted to make again will have one key piece missing.
  • If you drop something out of your sewing basket, it will be your box of pins--with the cover off.
  • When the construction process is going well, the bobbin thread runs out.
  • The magnitude of the goof is in direct proportion to the cost of the fabric.
  • Your lost needle will be found by your son, husband or brother-in-law while walking around barefoot.
  • Facings tend to be sewn to the wrong side. (Opposite sides attract.)
  • Collar points don't match and you've trimmed all the seams.
  • The iron never scorches the garment until its final pressing
  • Pants seams always rip where they are the most noticeable.
  • The steam iron only burps rusty water on light silk fabric.
  • The sewing machine light usually burns out on Sunday.
  • Pinking shears get dull just by looking at them.
  • Gathering threads always break in the middle.
  • The scissors cut easiest past the buttonhole.
**************************************************

I also have a great tip to share with you. I have several bobbins, well actually all of my bobbins are partially filled with thread that is never the color I need to match the project that I am working on. While working on a muslin I decided to use my partially filled bobbins and found that was a great way to empty them and make good use of the thread. Since it is just a muslin the threads do not have to match the fabric.



No comments: